Endangered African American Historic Sites

Climate change threatens Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park

At first glance, the landscape seems to have changed little since Harriet Tubman's day. The pine forests, marshes and farm fields she once traversed as a conductor on the Underground Railroad have remained largely untouched over the past 160 years. Even the country store that was the setting of her earliest known defiance against slavery still stands along a sleepy ribbon of road.

But this sacred land is changing, its permanence imperiled by the unholy forces of climate change. By the end of this century, much of land so recently designated as the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park and the area around it could be underwater, researchers say.

At first glance, the landscape seems to have changed little since Harriet Tubman's day. The pine forests, marshes and farm fields she once traversed as a conductor on the Underground Railroad have remained largely untouched over the past 160 years. Even the country store that was the setting of her earliest known defiance against slavery still stands along a sleepy ribbon of road. 

But this sacred land is changing, its permanence imperiled by the unholy forces of climate change. By the end of this century, much of land so recently designated as the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park and the area around it could be underwater, researchers say.

 

 

Links:

Climate change threatens the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historic Park in Church Creek, Maryland

'Culture will be eroded': climate crisis threatens to flood Harriet Tubman park

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